ESOL Childcare Fund

As you welcome and support families into your communities, one of the key areas of focus will be the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes. Adult members of the family are required to attend eight hours of ESOL classes per week. We realise that physically attending these classes isn’t always easy – and…

Experts by Experience: Resettlement as a single parent

Making the journey firstly from your home country to a host country, and then to another country via resettlement, is a hard undertaking for any family – and one that becomes even more difficult as a single parent. The reassurance there is in being able to turn to your partner in such a situation, and…

Indefinite Leave to Remain: Changes to status for UKRS

Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILtR) means that there is no time limit for how long you can remain in the UK. It means that you are entitled to access benefits, education, healthcare and other rights of UK Citizens. It is possible to apply for Citizenship after you have lived here for 5 years. More details…

Supporting refugees to access mental health support

‘In many ways, mental health is just like physical health: everybody has it and we need to take care of it.Good mental health means being generally able to think, feel and react in the ways that you need and want to live your life. But if you go through a period of poor mental health…

Understanding the emotional journey of refugees

It’s easy to assume that a refugee’s trauma has ended once they have been resettled in a new country. However, this isn’t always the case. Stages of trauma frequently include the following and need specific approaches and tailored support for each stage: Before migration: Persecution, possible torture and/or imprisonment, war, violence, economic hardship, loss.During migration:…

Experts by Experience – a call for Experts!

We know that the true experts in community led welcome are those who have welcomed, and those who have been welcomed. For this reason, we’re looking to grow the work we do with refugees, who are Experts by Experience.  An Expert by Experience is someone who has lived experience of the issues they’re discussing and…

Understanding children and young peoples mental health

The children within the family that you will sponsor may have experienced distressing or traumatic events. Adapting to a new country, including a new culture, language and school, can be challenging. Understandably, some children may need support with their mental health. Support services may be available through local charities, the child’s school or the NHS….

Adopting an empowerment approach to ILtR applications

For families who arrive before winter 2021, they will have been given the right to live and work here for 5 years.  Once the family members have been in the UK for 4 years and 11 months, they will need to submit an application for Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILtR).  The application process is carried out…

Birth registration guidance

If the family you support has welcomed a new baby since resettling in the UK, as a Community Sponsorship Group, you’ll need to help the family register the child’s birth with the Home Office. Resettled families will need to register the birth of their baby with your local council too.  Some hospitals may offer this…

Creating informal English learning opportunities

As refugee families are learning formal ESOL in the classroom, you can play a vital role by encouraging them to make use of all the great ways they can improve their English skills through more informal routes at home. The following suggestions are both practical and easy to incorporate – while also helping to change…

Designing a pathway into employment

Employment provides a fantastic route to integration, helps people to improve their language skills and social networks, and of course provides greater wellbeing and financial independence for individuals. However, refugees can face barriers to obtaining employment which you may need to help them overcome. It is important that both you and the person you support…

Developing an empowerment approach to managing utility bills

Part of your role as Community Sponsor will be supporting the refugee family to manage and budget for their utility bills independently. Navigating an array of options available to UK consumers can be difficult for people who speak English fluently, let alone a newly arrived family. In this resource we highlight some of the key…

Driving in the UK

Community Sponsorship Groups have shared with us that many of the newly arrived refugees they are welcoming are keen to have access to their own transport, to enable them to be independent. Refugees arriving with a valid driving licence from another country are usually permitted to drive on that licence for 12 months. In order to continue…

Education in Scotland

All of the children in the family you welcome are entitled to access education when they arrive in Scotland. They are automatically entitled to the same provision as a Scottish child. The Local Authority will determine how to assess the support required for children who need language support and are 16 and over. There will be…

Empowering refugee children

When Community Sponsorship Groups begin supporting resettled families, if there are children in the family, they appear to be highly adaptable; they learn English quickly and the younger they are, the faster they seem to settle into a new environment. However, it’s important for Community Sponsorship Groups to remember that moving to a new place, away…