ESOL Childcare Fund

As you welcome and support families into your communities, one of the key areas of focus will be the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes. Adult members of the family are required to attend eight hours of ESOL classes per week. We realise that physically attending these classes isn’t always easy – and…

Experts by Experience: Resettlement as a single parent

Making the journey firstly from your home country to a host country, and then to another country via resettlement, is a hard undertaking for any family – and one that becomes even more difficult as a single parent. The reassurance there is in being able to turn to your partner in such a situation, and…

Accessing digital services

Accessing services and details online will be essential for the family you support.  From registering for and managing their benefits through to connecting with friends and family across the world, developing IT skills will only be helpful. We like to remind Groups that success in Community Sponsorship is when resettled families are able to do…

Creating informal English learning opportunities

As refugee families are learning formal ESOL in the classroom, you can play a vital role by encouraging them to make use of all the great ways they can improve their English skills through more informal routes at home. The following suggestions are both practical and easy to incorporate – while also helping to change…

Experts by Experience: property investment

When it comes to finding a property for a refugee family, it can feel like an insurmountable obstacle to overcome given the lack of affordable housing in the UK. We’ve seen how groups have been creative in meeting this housing challenge; some are able to find compassionate landlords who are willing to rent below the…

Moving house

After arrival, some families might express an interest in moving elsewhere in the UK. There could be many reasons for this; they may have relatives or friends elsewhere, they might wish to live somewhere more or less quiet than where they currently are or where there is a larger population of people who speak the…

Preparing for uncomfortable conversations

When the resettled family you support arrives there are some key conversations you’ll need to have, and some topics will arise that may feel a little awkward. Uncomfortable conversations will happen, but they don’t have to be embarrassing or catch you off guard. Be confident that it’s ok to have them as the family’s wellbeing and integration…

Supporting refugees affected by the benefit cap

The benefit cap is a limit on the total amount of welfare benefits each family or individual receives. The benefit cap affects Universal Credit as well as Child Benefit (if the family you support still gets legacy benefits you can find list of all affected benefits here). As of 20 October 2021, the benefit cap…

Addressing housing complaints

As a Community Sponsorship Group, you will have gone to great lengths to source suitable housing for a refugee family. You will have invited your Local Authority to view the accommodation for suitability, you may be paying a housing top up and you may even have renovated or bought the property. The refugees you support…

Addressing misinformation about life in the UK

Moving to a new country without speaking the language, knowing the house you’ll move  to and having only a vague idea of the support you’ll receive can be a terrifying prospect. It is not surprising that many refugees decide to seek information on what to expect in the UK wherever they can. Those who can,…

Adopting an empowerment approach to housing provision

This resource will help your Group support refugees to understand their housing obligations to foster independence and empowerment as renters in the future. The family you support as a Community Sponsorship Group will include adults who have lived independent lives. They’ll have been making choices for themselves and their families for a long time. When it…

Changes to BRPs

The Biometric Residency Permit is the ID card that will be issued to each family member once they have arrived in the UK. It is the size of a bank card, which can be used as proof of identity, and to confirm the right to work or study in the UK and the right to access…

Divorce and separation

Like with any relationship, problems can arise for everyone no matter where or how you have been living. This is including for those who have been forced to flee their homes and are displaced. We have heard of situations where, after arrival to the UK, newly resettled refugees have experienced a marriage breakdown. There could…

Hate crime briefing

Sadly, hate crime against refugees is a very real problem. Although it is not by any means a common occurrence, it is something that is encountered all too frequently. However, it is something that the UK authorities now take very seriously. There are various ways in which incidents can be reported, and clear procedures on…

Introduction to empowerment and integration

Integrating into a new country, or community, is a very personal process and it is impossible to put a timescale on how long it will take for someone to feel integrated. For some people, it may be a matter of months. For others, it could take years and integration is an ongoing process. It may…

Managing Risk

We don’t want to pretend that Community Sponsorship comes without challenges.  Everything you do is about working with people, and this isn’t always an easy task! Reset are on hand to help you navigate challenges as they happen, however, groups may find it useful whilst they are planning their applications to consider how they will…